School Readiness Checklists for Kindergarten Enterance
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School Readiness Checklists for Kindergarten Enterance

School readiness refers to a child’s mastery over the set of skills that are required to meet the demands of school. By evaluating your child’s school readiness, you will ensure that they have the skills required to be successful in class. Kindergarten readiness involves four areas of development: Intellectual, physical, social/emotional, and self-care. One of these areas is known as physical health and well-being. Because a child’s physical well-being can affect their ability to actively engage both physically and mentally, this area is said by researchers to be one of the cornerstones of school readiness. “Physical health and well-being” is defined as the ability to be fully engaged on a regular basis with developmentally appropriate activities. This includes physical readiness for the school day, physical independence, as well as gross and fine motor skills. Children who are ready in this domain will be able to meet the physical challenges of school.

School readiness refers to a child’s mastery over the set of skills that are required to meet the demands of school. By evaluating your child’s school readiness, you will ensure that they have the skills required to be successful in class. Kindergarten readiness involves four areas of development: Intellectual, physical, social/emotional, and self-care.

One of these areas is known as physical health and well-being. Because a child’s physical well-being can affect their ability to actively engage both physically and mentally, this area is said by researchers to be one of the cornerstones of school readiness.

“Physical health and well-being” is defined as the ability to be fully engaged on a regular basis with developmentally appropriate activities. This includes physical readiness for the school day, physical independence, as well as gross and fine motor skills. Children who are ready in this domain will be able to meet the physical challenges of school.

Fine motor skills refer to your child’s ability to use their hands & in respect to school readiness, they include pre-printing, pencil grasp, & scissors skills. Preprinting, pencil grasp, & scissors skills play paramount roles in Kindergarten as children learn to print, colour & cut. Consequently it is crucial to consider these skills when evaluating your child’s school readiness.

There's no perfect formula that determines when children are truly ready for kindergarten, you can use following checklist to see how well your child is doing in acquiring the skills found on most kindergarten checklists.

Check list to assess your child in the following areas:

  1. Play skills
  2. Social development
  3. Cognitive development
  4. Fine motor skills
  5. Language and communication skills
  6. Emotional development
  7. Self care skills
  8. Gross motor skills

Is your child ready for school?

If you have doubts about your child being able to begin school and cope academically, it might be a good idea to have them assessed with a standardised intelligence test. This gives parents a clear indication of where their child fits or stands compared with children of a similar age.

Check the skills your child has mastered. Then recheck every month to see what additional skills your child can accomplish easily. Young children change so fast -- if they can't do something this week, they may be able to do it a few weeks later.

  • Listen to stories without interrupting
  • Recognize rhyming sounds
  • Pay attention for short periods of time to adult-directed tasks
  • Understand actions have both causes and effects
  • Show understanding of general times of day                            
  • Cut with scissors
  • Trace basic shapes
  • Begin to share with others
  • Start to follow rules
  • Be able to recognize authority
  • Manage bathroom needs
  • Button shirts, pants, coats, and zip up zippers
  • Begin to control oneself
  • Separate from parents without being upset
  • Speak understandably
  • Talk in complete sentences of five to six words
  • Look at pictures and then tell stories
  • Identify rhyming words
  • Identify the beginning sound of some words
  • Identify some alphabet letters
  • Recognize some common sight words like "stop"
  • Sort similar objects by color, size, and shape
  • Recognize groups of one, two, three, four, and five objects
  • Count to ten
  • Bounce a ball
  • If your child has acquired most of the skills on this checklist and will be at least four years old at the start of the summer before he or she starts kindergarten, he or she is probably ready for kindergarten.

Related: school.familyeducation.com

Research has suggested that many aspects of children’s lives influence their preparation for formal school learning,

including cognitive, social, emotional, and motor development, and, most importantly, early home, parental, and preschool

experience. 

Important: Because it is normal for children to learn different skills at different rates, it is inappropriate to judge school readiness based on a prescribed set of skills and abilities. While schools may reasonably expect that children enter kindergarten as active, curious, and eager learners, it is not reasonable to expect that all 5-year-olds have the same level of preparation needed to acquire early reading, math, and social skills, or have the same attention spans or motor dexterity. It is the school’s job to teach children at their own level and to meet each child’s needs, not the child’s job to meet the school’s expectations upon entry. School readiness should signify the need for educators to be ready for the child as much as it has come to signify the child’s need to be ready for the school.

Note: Check the 'useful links' section as it helps you learn more about the topic.

Useful links:

* Kindergarten readiness test to assess your child (After completing this assessment, you will see personalized commentary about your child and tailored suggestions to help him develop skills that are essential for beginning school prepared to succeed)

* School readiness- Physical health and well being

* Is Your Child Ready for Kindergarten?

* Ready for Kindergarten?- Five teachers tell you what preschoolers really need for next year.

* School Readiness—Preparing Children for Kindergarten and Beyond: Information for Parents

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Comments (6)

Thanks for posting this important article for young parents. Well done. Voted you up.

Great informative article

This is very sensitive of you. To have that much care and concern for the kids is very motherly. Great job!

Exceptional information here! Voted up!

Comprehensive readiness, near perfection, well done Amera.

Good job from a real expert. Thank you. Voted up.

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